Floodlight/Projects

 

"PUBLICA, the public arts festival, returned to Delhi in 2016 in a bigger, more engaging and more international form.
THE BIGGER PICTURE

 

"THE BIGGER PICTURE" AN EXHIBITION OF INDIAN CONTEMPORARY ART WAS ORGANIZED IN NEW DELHI
THE BIGGER PICTURE

The Floodlight Foundation partnered with the charity, "The Bigger Picture" in support of the under-privileged and needy children in India. Works were sold to support the charity's cause. We express our warmest thanks to all our partners and supporters without whom all our events and initiatives would not have been possible.

 

"TRIBE VIBE" WAS ORGANIZED AT LALIT KALA AKADEMI, NEW DELHI
TRIBE VIBE
E-Invite of TRIBE VIBE

The Floodlight Foundation presented "Tribe Vibe", the first solo of much-acclaimed artist Bhuwal Prasad. The exhibition that showcased 30 stunning, monumental works by the artist, was held at the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi during September and October, 2014. Surbhi Modi opened the exhibition, with a talk on "decoding abstraction" where she presented works of leading international abstract painters such as Mondrian, Pollock and Malevich among others and shed some light on Bhuwal Prasad's oeuvre

FLOODLIGHT TALKS

Floodlight Talks

Floodlight Talks launched in collaboration with Start in April 2014, that explored works that dealt with the grotesque in Western contemporary art and linked to the current exhibition.

BEAUTY IN THE BEAST

Beauty in the Beast

Beauty in the Beast was a group exhibition that was curated by Surbhi Modi at the Alliance Francaise De De Delhi that explored the notion of the grotesque in contemporary art. The exhibition showcased works by Abhijit Pathak, Anant Mishra, Arun Pandit, Bhuwal Prasad, Hifzul Sheikh, Mangesh Rajguru, Mohd Arif, Nayanna Kanoria and Rajesh Srivastava. The exhibition presented works where abstraction was at odds with figuration, where the aesthetic met the anaesthetic and an altered reality was created.

PUBLICA 13

The last edition of PUBLICA engaged over two million people over its month long stint. The ten venues were an exciting mix of cultural and popular spots spread across the city, which included the usual art exhibition venues to the busy shopping malls to the bustling street markets to exclusive luxury stores; PUBLICA overtook the entire city, platforming art like never before.

The Foundation self commissioned four works and partnered with several galleries to commission all works, which the galleries generously produced and installed at various venues. We worked closely with their artists, who beautifully responded to the theme of the ‘Spectacle’ whether it was Nandan Ghiya’s interactive vintage photo-booth or Jeremy Hutchison’s five-headed see-saw, where children and adults took turns to take a break from the shopping, or Achia Anzi’s poetic work that left many glued to the site, trying to make sense of the Hebrew poem, that accompanied the work, or finally Mangesh Guru’s double-headed scooter that turned many a head, all the works left an impact on the on-lookers. Shweta Bhattad opened PUBLICA with her hard-hitting performance piece that dealt with how our films abet rapes and women’s crimes.

The Hop-on Hop-off buses, one of the festival’s cultural partners, toured PUBLICA’s venues, giving passengers a gist of what they were about to see, thus entrenching PUBLICA into the tourist’s itinerary.

Over 40 articles across the leading newspapers, magazines and websites, were written featuring the festival, talking about its impact and various facets. Some lauded the festival, others wondered why this was not done before, and others still, talked about censorship in the public domain. We were happy that these issues were finally being addressed.